Department of Comparative Study of Cultures

Admissions policy

The Department of Comparative Study of Cultures looks at modern society which must consider how to achieve a sustainable economy and society, as well as a philosophy and method that allow for the coexistence of people from different cultures. The department’s goal is to develop leaders who have a comprehensive understanding of culture and society, who explore from various angles, and who will continue to create a new culture and society.
To achieve this, this department seeks various students who embody the following.

  • Students who possess a basic scholastic ability.
  • Students who are interested in culture in Japan and in areas around the world.
  • Students who possess a broad interest in issues and trends in the modern world and society.
  • Students who are motivated to acquire foreign languages such as English and use it as an instrument to collect information and compare cultures.
  • Students who are interested in investigating topics that interest them.
  • Students who are interested in activities geared toward various issues that face modern society.

Curriculum policy

The goal of the Department of Comparative Study of Cultures is to develop students who possess a deep understanding of how society and culture in Japan and in each area around the world are made up, and who conduct critical analysis toward the modern world while using an interdisciplinary approach to explore the relationship and comparison between various cultures and society. The curriculum is made from the following 5 perspectives.

  • Comparative culture perspective and method: Students use various research methods to look at culture and society in Japan and throughout the world in order to understand their mutual relationships, and study from introductory courses and core courses in Area I and from comparative culture basic seminars in Area II.
  • Students analyze the structure and the dynamics of the modern world and develop an understanding of its issues. Students look at individual cultures, how society exists and mutual relationships, and how that is related to the composition, structure, order and whereabouts in the modern world. They also look at issues that the modern world faces and the activities of the international society, the state and the citizens that grapple with those issues, by using a theoretical and interdisciplinary approach and taking courses in Area I. In addition, students use various references and materials to specifically learn from specialized readings on comparative cultures in Area II.
  • Students specifically gain an understanding on culture and society in different areas. Students look at how culture and society are formed in each area around the world as well as at the changes and issues that we face today, by specifically learning from regional research courses in Area I. In addition, students use various references and materials to specifically learn from specialized readings on comparative cultures in Area II.
  • Students gain a comprehensive understanding of the mutual relationships between cultures and societies. Students in the third and fourth years select a seminar in comparative cultures in Area II and tackle more specific and specialized topics. And, students ultimately set their own research topic to complete their graduation thesis as a culmination of their studies.
  • Students acquire language and investigative skills. In the specialized readings on comparative cultures in Area II, students mainly read historical documents and acquire the language skills required for researching culture and society. In addition, the department focuses on English education by offering specialized English courses in Area III that are unique to the department. This allows students to hone their reading ability to look critically at English text while also developing practical communicative skills and forms of expression. In addition, the practical courses in Area IV allow students to acquire methods to collect materials and conduct field investigations.

Diploma policy

To be eligible to graduate, students must complete the department’s curriculum, which focuses on developing a deep understanding of culture and society in Japan and in areas around the world while crossing over disciplines in comparative cultures. Students acquire the following knowledge and skills by the time they graduate.

  • Students develop a deep understanding of conflicts, interaction and transformations between cultures and societies in Japan and around the world, and gain a comprehensive understanding of the modern world.
  • Students develop a deep understanding of language and acquire foreign language skills such as English.
  • Students are able to select various materials and information and can gather and analyze it by using specialized knowledge.
  • Students acquire the ability and skills to take the initiative to communicate how a new culture and society can exist in the world and communities.
  • Students promote the mutual understanding and interaction between cultures and societies, and are able to create a new culture and society as well as contribute to the international society.